Movement adopts new logo

For the first time in its 150-year-plus history, the Movement has approved a Movement-wide logo representing all its components — the ICRC, National Societies and the IFRC. The new logo — a cross and a crescent partially encircled by the words ‘International Movement’ — does not replace existing logos of Movement components. Rather, it is to be used exceptionally, for representation, communication, global fund-raising and promotional activities and to represent Movement components collectively on matters of global concern or interest.

Send us your impressions

Send your comments about the new logo to rcrc@ifrc.org. We will forward them to the IFRC and ICRC communications teams involved in decisions about the new logo.

Related

What happens when machines can decide who to kill?

It’s the stuff of science fiction: machines that make decisions about who and when to kill. Referred to as “autonomous weapons”, they’re already in use to some degree. But as more sophisticated systems are being developed we wanted to an expert in the field about whether such systems comply with international humanitarian law and what it means for humanity to give machines the power over human life and death.

‘Wildfire diaries’ and radical change in communications

In this episode, we talk with humanitarian communicator Kathy Mueller who produced our first magazine podcast series, The Wildfire Diaries, about massive wildfires in Northern Canada in 2017. We talk about that series, her many international missions, and the big changes in humanitarian communications since she began with the Canadian Red Cross almost 20 years ago.

The power of storytelling

In this episode, we talk about the power of storytelling to inform and inspire. “Storytelling is a fundamental aspect of human communication,” says our guest Prodip, a volunteer and multi-media storyteller for the Bangladesh Red Crescent. “It inspires us to be a hero of our own community.” We also speak with one such community hero, Dalal al-Taji, a longtime volunteer and advocate for inclusion of people with disabilities in emergencies response. “In disasters. persons with disabilities sometimes get forgotten.”

This post is also available in:

Discover more stories

Get stories worth sharing delivered to your inbox

Want to stay up to date?

This might interest you...

Mega cities, mega heat

As urbanization contributes to warming and puts the most vulnerable at risk, how are cities like Hong Kong coping with climate change?

Check it out