Photo: REUTERS/Ismail Zetouni

ICRC helps four athletes realize a dream

Four athletes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) represented their country at the Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in September, with the support of their national paralympic committee and the ICRC. “I never expected to get this far, I’m so happy!” said Luyina Kiese Rosette, who took up athletics in 2010 after losing part of her right leg due to stepping on a landmine. Through the ICRC’s physical rehabilitation programme, she received treatment and an orthopaedic device. In Rio, Rosette and fellow athlete Tolombo Kitete Crispin competed in the shot-put and javelin. Two other athletes from the DRC — Mwengani Mabonze John and Kinzonzi Kaba Paul — competed in the track events.

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