Movement mourns more aid worker killings

More Movement aid workers have tragically lost their lives after being deliberately targeted in violent attacks. In September, a physiotherapist in ICRC’s rehabilitation centre in Mazare- Sharif, Afghanistan, was shot, apparently by a patient, as she went about her daily work helping people relearn how to walk or complete other tasks after losing limbs or suffering from other disabilities. Lorena Enebral Perez, from Spain, was 38 years old. This senseless tragedy came three days after an ICRC truck driver, Lukudu Kennedy Laki Emmanuel, was shot and killed in South Sudan. Known as kind, fun-loving and generous, Emmanuel was delivering essential goods when the convoy of trucks he was part of came under fire. In June, a volunteer for the Central African Red Cross Society, Joachim Ali was killed by an unidentified armed group while on duty at a Red Cross compound in the town of Bangassou. “He was a young, brave man. He was committed and dedicated to his work,” said Antoine Mbao-Bogo, president of the Central African Red Cross Society.

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It’s the stuff of science fiction: machines that make decisions about who and when to kill. Referred to as “autonomous weapons”, they’re already in use to some degree. But as more sophisticated systems are being developed we wanted to an expert in the field about whether such systems comply with international humanitarian law and what it means for humanity to give machines the power over human life and death.

‘Wildfire diaries’ and radical change in communications

In this episode, we talk with humanitarian communicator Kathy Mueller who produced our first magazine podcast series, The Wildfire Diaries, about massive wildfires in Northern Canada in 2017. We talk about that series, her many international missions, and the big changes in humanitarian communications since she began with the Canadian Red Cross almost 20 years ago.

The power of storytelling

In this episode, we talk about the power of storytelling to inform and inspire. “Storytelling is a fundamental aspect of human communication,” says our guest Prodip, a volunteer and multi-media storyteller for the Bangladesh Red Crescent. “It inspires us to be a hero of our own community.” We also speak with one such community hero, Dalal al-Taji, a longtime volunteer and advocate for inclusion of people with disabilities in emergencies response. “In disasters. persons with disabilities sometimes get forgotten.”

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